New camper ‘shakedown’ weekend – day two

The second night of sleep was very comfortable.  The Vornado  electric heater ran the entire night and kept the camper in the mid-50s, even with an outside temp in the high 20s.  When getting up I did turn on the Atwood furnace that quickly brought the temp into the upper 60s.  I turned off the propane heater at that time letting the Vernado keep the camper comfortable.


Read parts one and two of the ‘shakedown weekend – PART ONE or PART TWO


The Dometic fridge had been running in 110V mode since yesterday afternoon.  The fridge temp was still low – just above freezing.  With more time in the camper I am sure I’ll have a better feeling for how to set the thermostat based on the outside temp.

After using the KOA’s bathroom I had a good breakfast and did some reading.

Though no longer operational the KOA has kept the a phone booth in place by the main office building.  I guess it can be used as an instructional tool for younger folks that have never seen a payphone.

Though no longer operational the KOA has kept the a phone booth in place by the main office building. I guess it can be used as an instructional tool for younger folks that have never seen a payphone.

Around 11AM I broke camp and headed for the place I work, Sage Marine, to conduct the repair to the door’s deadbolt.

I couldn’t get the screws holding the strike plate in place to back out so I drilled off the heads.  With the strike plate removed I could see that the assembler had already tried to correct the problem, twice, with no success.

I set the strike plate into the correct position and re-insalled the plate with some sheet metal screws.  The prior install attempts left visible holes above the strike plate that I covered/filled with some Sikaflex 291.

The strike plate has been moved down so the deadbolt now works.  Note screw hole above the plate that was the door builder's first, of two' attempts to mount the plate.

The strike plate has been moved down so the deadbolt now works. Note screw hole above the plate that was the door builder’s first, of two’ attempts, to mount the plate.

Here the old mounting hole is covered with bedding compound, along with some in the lower gap to keep water from getting into the door jam.

Here the old mounting hole is covered with bedding compound, along with some in the lower gap to keep water from getting into the door jam.

At this point I moved my camping supplies out of the Outfitter into my Roamin Chariot as I was headed to Arizona for a sailboat regatta (click here to read that report).

Overall the weekend was a success.  All critical systems are working and one issue, the door’s deadbolt, was easily fixed.

As I write this I am a few days away from departing on a trip that will keep me on the road for most of February, traveling at least 6,000 miles, and going to the east coast, back across the country to the west coast, and then back home to Denver.  This trip will be taken with the Toyota Tundra and Outfitter.  Look for updates as I report on the trip & the Outfitter.

– Dave

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